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The Inventions of Martha Coston Signal Flares That Saved Sailors" Lives (19th Century American Inventors) by Holly Cefrey

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  • 57 Currently reading

Published by PowerKids Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Flares,
  • Signals and signaling,
  • Coston, Benjamin Franklin,,
  • Biography & Autobiography - Science & Technology,
  • Children"s Books/Ages 9-12 Biography,
  • Juvenile literature,
  • Children: Grades 2-3,
  • Inventors,
  • Coston, Martha J.,,
  • Biography,
  • United States,
  • 1821-1848,
  • 1826-1886

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8121313M
ISBN 100823964442
ISBN 109780823964444
OCLC/WorldCa49283951

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  The Inventions of Martha Coston: Signal Flares That Saved Sailors' Lives (Reading Power: 19th Century American Inventors) [Cefrey, Holly] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Inventions of Martha Coston: Signal Flares That Saved Sailors' Lives (Reading Power: 19th Century American Inventors)Author: Holly Cefrey. Martha Jane Coston (Decem – July 9, ) was an inventor and businesswoman best known for her invention of the Coston flare, a device for signaling at sea. 2 Flare design and business. 3 International successes and the Civil War. 4 Use of the Coston flare in the United States Life-Saving Service. 7 Further reading. 8 External links. The Inventions of Martha Coston: Signal Flares That Saved Sailors' Lives (19th Century American Inventors) [Cefrey, Holly] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Inventions of Martha Coston: Signal Flares That Saved Sailors' Lives (19th Century American Inventors)Author: Holly Cefrey. Get this from a library! The inventions of Martha Coston: signal flares that saved sailors' lives. [Holly Cefrey] -- Chronicles the work of Martha Coston to perfect and market signal flares to the U.S. Navy and abroad.

Martha J. Coston. Pyrotechnic signaling system. Widowed at the age of 21, Martha Coston () of Philadelphia met the challenge of providing for her four children by inventing a system of maritime signal flares that would later help the North win the Civil War.   An easy-to-scan alphabetical list of famous inventions and innovations, plus photos and links to additional information, biographies, and timelines. Martha Coston invented a system of maritime signal flares. Skyscrapers. The skyscraper like many other architectural forms, evolved over a long period of : Mary Bellis. There he continued to produce valuable inventions, but he also continued to work with dangerous chemicals. It was not long before he succumbed to the dangers of his work and died at just twenty-six. Worse still, Martha Coston was left a widow with . Martha J. Coston (), was an inventor and successful businesswoman during the second half of the 19th century. She made her mark with one invention, which she wrote about in her one book, an autobiography, A Signal Success.

At a time when women did little more than keep house and raise families, Martha Coston was busy saving lives by perfecting the night signal flare. Coston's signal flare was an important tool for the Union army during the Civil War. Compelling text, photos, and patent drawings show readers how this young woman went from widower to inventor, businessperson, and author. I am a direct decendent of Martha and Benjamin Franklin Coston. I have the Coston book "Signal Success" by Martha and a patent or patents of some inventions. In the Coston book, P chapter 1,the first real submarine having eight hours under water and no communications with the out side world. Which is my main intrest.   Lillian Gilbreth improved existing inventions with small, but ingenious, tweaks. humorously wrote about their home/work collaborations in the book Cheaper by Martha Coston didn't come up. Martha Coston invented a system of maritime signal flares based on color and pattern. Using various color combinations, these flares made ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore communication possible. In February , C.S. McCauley, Captain and Senior Officer of the United States Navy, recommended the signals to the Secretary of the Navy, Isaac Toucey.